5 Myths About Diablo 3 that People Should Stop Believing

A simple look at the battle.net forums at this moment shows that many people are clearly lacking in Diablo 3 knowledge. Or skill. Or both.

Myth #5: The New Repair Costs Make You Lose Gold By Playing the Game

The Myth: Patch 1.0.3 increased repair costs somewhere between 4x and 6x, therefore you must experience a net loss in gold while playing Diablo 3, and therefore must use the Real Money Auction House (RMAH).

The Reality: Even with the increased repair costs, many people (including me) are still making six digits an hour. The only way you can possibly be losing THAT MUCH gold is if you’re dying 20+ times an hour. In that case, you’re definitely undergeared or underskilled for the content and should play an easier level.

It is true, however, that the higher repair costs strongly discourage experimenting with new skill builds in hard content. But you can try them out in easier content and get familiar with them first if you really wanted to.

Myth #4: The Auction House Determines the Drop Rates

The Myth: Your individual drops are lowered because other people posted items on the Auction House. Blizzard said so.

The Reality: Blizzard never said such a thing. The quote that the myth spreaders are referring to was taken out of context and twisted. When asked about this, Blizzard responded by saying the Auction House has absolutely no effect on drop rates.

Myth #3: Blizzard Executed a Bait and Switch By Nerfing IAS

The Myth: All increased attack speed (IAS) bonuses besides on quivers were nerfed in patch 1.0.3. Before the patch, many people had used the Real Money Auction House (RMAH) to sell and purchase items with IAS, and Blizzard gets a cut of the RMAH auctions. After the patch, such items were not as valuable, and since Blizzard got a cut of the money transferred, Blizzard is liable for Bait and Switch.

The Reality: First of all, it wasn’t a Bait and Switch. Blizzard didn’t sell you something and then have it not work. You paid someone else. Blizzard’s 15% transaction fee doesn’t count as selling something. Second, Blizzard announced two weeks in advance that they were going to nerf IAS, so numerous complaints of “I bought this item from someone only to have it nerfed the next day” are pretty much like someone buying an analog TV the day before the digital TV switch and then complain that it doesn’t work. Someone who actually shelled out $250 on an item should probably learn to read information on what they buy next time they are about to do so. Third, the game was only just over a month old, which means that many things in it are unstable. Would you risk investments in markets unstable as this one in real life? Probably not.

Myth #2: My Class Sucks, The Other Classes Are Overpowered

The Myth: They need to buff my class, nerf everyone else.

The Reality: None of them can do well with bad gear, and all of them can obliterate Inferno with great gear. I wrote extensively about class balance here.

Myth #1: You Cannot Find Any Gear Upgrades, You Must Use the AH or RMAH

The Myth: You can’t find good gear yourself; you must use the AH or RMAH to get upgrades.

The Reality: There is a big, glaring problem with this theory: Where do you think such items you see on the AH come from? Someone found it. Yep. Logic 101’d.

Sure, you might complain that you are not finding upgrades in a reasonable amount of time. But this is all due to math and the use of the AH in the first place. I dare anyone who thinks they can’t find an upgrades to level a fresh character and play Inferno Act 1 without ever using the AH. At first, you will probably be finding upgrades left and right. As your gear gets better, the harder it is to find the next upgrade. This happens mathematically, with no conspiracy on Blizzard’s part.

For the sake of imagination, pretend all items are on a 0-100 scale, 100 being perfectly rolled, best-in-slot. And say you start out with all your items at 0.

  • At first, anything you pick up is going to be an upgrade. So you have a 100% chance of finding an upgrade.
  • As your items reach 50, your chance of finding an upgrade drops to 50%.
  • As your items reach 90, your chance of finding an upgrade drops to 10%.
  • As your items reach 99, your chance of finding an upgrade drops to 1%.
  • And so on.

If you go on the AH and buy an item that’s very well-rolled, say a 99.9, you have a mere 0.1% chance of finding an upgrade for it. And that’s the problem. Most people just use the AH to buy the 99+ items, play the content much easier than it was designed to be, and then complain that they’re not finding upgrades that are better than their already amazing gear. Remember when you killed Inferno Butcher with that 1400 dps weapon? And probably a bunch of ilvl 62 and ilvl 63 gear? The internal testers did it with a 492 dps weapon and all ilvl 61 or lower gear, and all without having an AH. People who complain that they can’t find any upgrades have spoiled themselves in a way by purchasing the 99’s on the AH, thus making Act 1 and even Act 2 much easier than they should be.

Indeed, when I got my Barbarian to level 60, I bought a lot of gear from the AH, and only found one upgrade through my first entire runs of Acts 1 and 2.

After that, I built a Wizard, and I decided to build him with no AH gear to see what would happen. Indeed I noticed that even though Inferno Act 1 was very challenging with lower level gear, I was finding many upgrades. I even had a lucky streak where I found five upgrades in an hour. And even with a decently geared Wizard a few weeks later, as I was running my friend through Hell Act 4, I found an upgrade! According to the myth spreaders, such things should be impossible. Yet they can obviously happen. It just comes down to not spoiling yourself by using the AH. Once you buy the 99s, even a precious 97 or 98 you find will just be salvaged, even though it could have been an epic moment.

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